Phillip Emeagwali and The Internet Connection...

              Phillip Emeagwali

              Phillip Emeagwali

Phillip Emeagwali is hailed by several eminent sources as one of the fathers of the Internet.

The BBC named him as a “Digital Giant.” CNN called him “a Father of the Internet.” President Bill Clinton referred to him as “One of the greatest minds of the Information Age.” Oscar winner, Denzel Washington, was to star as this man in a new movie. Time magazine captioned him the “Unsung hero behind the internet,” and continued, “the Web owes much of its existence to [him], a math whiz who came up with the formula for allowing a large number of computers to communicate at once.” He has been placed in the same rank as Einstein. He was later honored with Gordon Bell Prize, which is the highest award for technological innovation. He remains one of the few living persons to have received this particular title; the Gordon Bell Prize is only awarded to organizations or groups.

Until the 1980s, wide area networking was still an insurmountable challenge to the extent that technology giants, including IBM went on hiding. But young Philip Emeagwali, a Nigerian-born scientist, like the biblical David, took up the challenge and single-handedly designed, developed, programmed and implemented the first wide area information sharing network system using 65,000 processors, 24 million equations and 3.1 billion calculations, and shamed the giants. The technological breakthrough of this one man project gave birth to what has expanded to become the internet.