White Supremacy Terrorism: Carrying Tiki torches, a group of white supremacists partake in a “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, Va.The group gathered to protest Charlottesville's plan to remove relics of its Confederate past - specifically a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee.

White Supremacy Terrorism: Carrying Tiki torches, a group of white supremacists partake in a “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, Va.The group gathered to protest Charlottesville's plan to remove relics of its Confederate past - specifically a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee.

“Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced.” -James Baldwin

The violence that erupted in Charlottesville last weekend has been the face of America since the beginning of time and no one knows that better, or has experienced the hatred and destructive, evil force of racism and bigotry greater, and longer, than Black people in this country. White nationalists and right-wing protesters who have converged on Charlottesville, Virginia, have been using a Nazi rallying cry "blood and soil." The group gathered to protest Charlottesville's plan to remove relics of its Confederate past, such as a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. The "blood and soil" chants began Friday night when torch-bearing protesters marched at the University of Virginia and clashed with counterprotesters.

More white nationalist protesters continued the cries during Saturday's gatherings. White Supremacy Terrorism: Carrying Tiki torches, a group of white supremacists partake in a “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, Va.The group gathered to protest Charlottesville's plan to remove relics of its Confederate past - specifically a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. MADE IN AMERICA ‘Charlottesville Is Just the Beginning’? Emboldened and proclaiming victory after a bloody weekend in Virginia, white nationalists are planning more demonstrations to promote their agenda following the violence that left a woman dead and dozens injured.

The University of Florida said white provocateur Richard Spencer, whose appearances sometimes stoke unrest, is seeking permission to speak there next month. And white nationalist Preston Wiginton said he is planning a “White Lives Matter” rally at Texas A&M University in September. Also, a neo-Confederate group has asked the state of Virginia for permission to rally at a monument to Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee in Richmond on Sept. 16, and other events are likely. "We’re going to be more active than ever before,” Matthew Heimbach, a white nationalist leader, said Monday. James Alex Fields Jr., a young man who was said to idolize Adolf Hitler and Nazi Germany in high school, was charged with killing a woman by slamming a car into a group of counter-protesters at the white nationalist rally Sunday in Charlottesville, Va. Fields, 20, who recently moved to Ohio from his home state of Kentucky, was held without bail on murder charges. He was photographed at the rally behind a shield bearing the emblem of the white nationalist Vanguard America, though the group denied he was a member.

The U.S. Justice Department said it will review the violence, and Attorney General Jeff Sessions told ABC that the death of counter-protester Heather Heyer, 32, met the definition of domestic terrorism. A neo-Nazi website that helped promote the gathering said there will be more events soon.

Barack Obama Urges World to Stand Against Aggressive Nationalism'

Former US president says countries must defend tolerance, moderation and respect for others or risk chaos and violence in speech in Indonesia

Barack Obama has called on the world to stand up for tolerance, moderation and respect for others – warning that sectarian politics could lead to chaos and violence.

The former US president said some countries had adopted “an aggressive kind of nationalism” and “increased resentment of minority groups”, in a speech in Indonesia on Saturday that could be seen as a commentary on the US as well as Indonesia.

“It’s been clear for a while that the world is at a crossroads. At an inflection point,” Obama said, telling a Jakarta crowd stories of how much the capital had improved since he lived there as a child. But he said that increased prosperity had been accompanied by new global problems, adding that as the world confronts issues ranging from inequality to terrorism, some countries – both developed and less developed – had adopted a more aggressive and isolationist stance.

“If we don’t stand up for tolerance and moderation and respect for others, if we begin to doubt ourselves and all that we have accomplished, then much of the progress that we have made will not continue,” he said. “What we will see is more and more people arguing against democracy, we will see more and more people who are looking to restrict freedom of the press, and we’ll see more intolerance, more tribal divisions, more ethnic divisions, and religious divisions and more violence.”

Obama was born to a Kenyan father and an American mother, but after she married an Indonesian, the family moved to Jakarta in 1967 when he was six, and stayed for four years. The 44th US president made sure the crowd knew he could still speak some Indonesian.

Obama never mentioned Donald Trump by name, but he chose a range of topics that could be seen to apply to politics in both Indonesia and the US, including fake news powered by social media, resentment, attacks on institutions, and ignorance of other peoples. When asked about Trump’s exit from the Paris climate deal by Dino Patti Djalal, former ambassador to the US and organizer of the Indonesia Diaspora Conference, Obama sought to downplay the move’s impact.

“First of all, I think it’s important that even though the current US administration has signaled it is going to pull out, technically it’s not out yet,” he said. “Point two is that many of the changes that we locked in during my administration continue.”

Coming back to the overarching theme of “unity in diversity” – Indonesia’s official national motto – Obama warned again where a different path could lead. “Let’s face it, if people do not show respect and tolerance, eventually you have war and conflict. Sooner or later societies break down.”

UPDATE:

Jackson, Miss. Mayor-elect Chokwe Lumumba:

I Plan to Build the "Most Radical City on the Planet"

Mayor -Elect Chokwe Lumumba

Mayor -Elect Chokwe Lumumba

JACKSON — "We have a lot of work to do," Mayor-elect Chokwe Lumumba said Tuesday night at the King Edward Hotel when he stepped to the microphone to acknowledge his overwhelmingly victory over a Republican and several independents. "If you have the best ideas, that's what we're moving with."

At 9:20 p.m. with 98 percent of the vote, Lumumba declared victory at the King Edward Hotel in downtown Jackson, Mississippi, chanting "One City, One Aim, One Destiny!" as he held a clear lead with more than 22,000 votes. His nearest rival, Republican nominee Jason Wells, had fewer than 1,000. Likewise, Lumumba stunned the city on May 2 when he defeated nine Democratic challengers in the primary to avoid a runoff.

Lumumba called on supporters to remember that with him voted in as mayor, they were "elected mayor," meaning they still had a lot of work to do. The mayor-elect, who is 34, repeated his pledge not to fire people for political reasons and to make Jackson safe for young children and for senior citizens; Lumumba ended his acceptance speech by saying "I love you all" and committing to an inclusive administration.

He also acknowledged one of his Democratic opponents, Ronnie Crudup Jr., who was at the victory party with his wife. "They have demonstrated their commitment. When Ronnie didn't win this, he didn't take his ball and go home. He joined us. He's been with us. So I'm happy to call him an ally; I'm happy to call him a friend. I thank you for that," Lumumba said.

Chokwe Lumumba is the son of the late Jackson Mayor Chokwe Lumumba, a longtime Black nationalist organizer and attorney, dubbed "America’s most revolutionary mayor" before his death in 2014. The 34-year-old Chokwe Antar Lumumba supports economic democracy, has proposed a civic incubator fund to support cooperative, member-owned businesses in Jackson. Shortly after his election, Lumumba was a featured speaker, just a few weeks ago, at the People’s Summit in Chicago. He has vowed to make Jackson the "the most radical city on the planet."